In with the Old | Art & Home

The latest edition of Art & Home is here! From a 19th-century farmhouse in the Hamptons to a 1930s Paris mansion, five historic homes blend tradition with modern updates, finds Iyna Bort Caruso.

IMG_9339Art & Home—June/July 2015

Call it the surprise inside: historic residences retrofitted with modern interiors.

Homeowners may love the idea of properties that embrace the aesthetics of an earlier era, but they’re drawing the line at living a century-old lifestyle. Instead of tearing down, however, they’re taking up the challenge. They’re purging boxy rooms, awkward layouts and tiny closets and arriving at that sweet spot where the age of grace meets the age of technology.

In America, homes of historic value are generally pegged at 50 years or older by the National Register of Historic Places, although those are relative newcomers by international standards. It takes the skills of true artisans to modernize a centuries-old German castle, French château, English manor or Italian villa, and many governments offer homeowners subsidies for their efforts.

More than just age, historic homes embody the spirit of the times in which they were built with character-defining features that speak to who we were and how we lived.

“There’s an emotional connection to be had, for sure,” says Judson Henderson of Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty in Princeton, NJ. The earliest homes here date back to the 18th century. Some homeowners bring “today’s practicality and sensitivity to home renovations” while others go for a gut renovation. “Walk through the door and it’s starkly modern. You feel like you’re in a brand new house,” Henderson says.

Most makeovers are somewhere in between, using architectural elements as jumping-off points to maintain some sense of authenticity.

Interior Designer Sarah Barnard in Santa Monica, Calif., is a specialist in historic home design. In reshaping Victorian, Spanish Revival and Arts and Craft estates, she often takes a hybrid approach, “preserving a lot of the original architectural elements and melding them with uber contemporary strategies.”

Deciding which of those elements to keep or discard can be a struggle. Is it worth sacrificing what Barnard calls the “heartwarming little details that made the owner’s heart sing in the initial walk-through” for the larger benefits of functionality and design?  “There are always hard decisions to be made but when budget is not an issue, rehabilitating the old is always my first choice.”

People may yearn for vintage homes for different reasons, but one thing they have in common is “kindness,” observes Barnard. “You have to have a sympathetic soul to want to save an old building.”

Miami$2,995,000  USD | Miami Beach, Florida | ONE Sotheby’s International Realty

Behind the Mediterranean facade and inviting courtyard, modern luxury meets the classic beauty of this 1929 home. Property features an open floor plan, added interior space, floating stairwell, Pecky Cypress vaulted ceiling, fireplace, charming/restored Cuban tile and hardwood flooring.

Hamptons$7,995,000 USD | Sagaponack, New York | Sotheby’s International Realty – East Hampton Brokerage

Once the home of James Jones, author of “From Here to Eternity”, this 1860s Sagaponack farmhouse was built to capture the sunsets from one of the highest points south of the Montauk highway. Today the house has been renovated and merges the intimate spaces of a traditional home with the open, naturally lit spaces of a modern SOHO loft. In addition, this home incorporated the Crestron computer network, clean conscious building techniques and materials, active solar power, and geothermal heating and cooling to create one of the most advanced, healthy and sustainable homes in the Hamptons.

Princeton$7,900,000 USD |Princeton, New Jersey | Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty

Stunningly transformed “Everlasting” rivals the toniest East Coast estates, yet is privately situated on 12 acres in Princeton. Under the eye of architect/designer Michael La Rocca, skilled artisans used materials of the highest caliber to expand, open and visually elevate the brick manor house and its grounds. The sleek central kitchen was cleverly planned with double islands to serve a single chef or a team of caterers.

Canada4 495 000$ CAD | Toronto, Canada | Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

Built in the early 1900’s, this spectacular and spacious home has been fully renovated with modern amenities and architectural elements including a high ceilinged study, and breathtaking 2 story glass-walled Great Room overlooking the verdant ravine lot and in ground pool and spa.

France33.000.000 € EUR | Paris, France | Paris Ouest Sotheby’s International Realty

This magnificent, ultra-rare historic Paris mansion dating from the 1930s has recently undergone a complete renovation and now offers sleek open spaces with a contemporary edge whilst at the same time carefully preserving its architectural heritage.

New York-based writer Iyna Bort Caruso has contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Newsday, among others.

View the digital version of this issue here: Art & Home June/July 2015

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The Unforgettable Collection

Wine collector and connoisseur Don Stott’s 50-year-long love affair with Burgundy and Bordeaux has led to a stellar collection, now coming to auction in New York on 8–9 May.

All great wine collectors have stories about their “conversion” and the pursuit of their passion. The routes to an extremely full cellar are many and diverse, sometimes involving a real coup de foudre, while others develop over decades. For Don Stott, the starting point was during his junior year at Princeton. While everyone else was drinking beer, Don was going to wine stores to learn, buy and taste different wines, primarily white Burgundies then. He had his first wine refrigerator in a dorm room as a graduate student.

A trip to France in 1963, with his best friend, Bill Burrow, was a milestone in Don’s wine life – he had embarked on a great journey. Don says that he went over to Europe on the great ocean liner France drinking Bordeaux, but came back drinking Burgundy. This visit to France must have been a real eye-opener for someone who had hitherto served Liebfraumilch, cream cheese and caviar to a date! Although I think this might have worked for me, Don would probably serve a different combination today. An illustrious Frenchman with a taste for the good life had told Don to look out for Domaine de la Romanée Conti and de Vogüé, so he did start at the top.

This appreciation of quality has stood him in good stead throughout his wine-loving life and it is the leitmotif of his extraordinary wine collection.

027N09327_XXXXX_SILO
6 bottles 2002 Corton-Charlemagne, JF Coche-Dury ($10,000–14,000)

Right from this point, a flame had been ignited. Don was advised to buy the 1961 Bordeaux, which he duly did, and he began buying wine futures. Pétrus was a favourite, from the outset. He fell in love with white Burgundy and, throughout the 1980s, closely followed DRC’s Le Montrachet. Raveneau was recommended to him and he never looked back. New York’s most fabled restaurants, where wine is key, became homes-away-from-home, starting with the legendary 21 Club. Don ate upstairs there as a child and later graduated to “colluding” with their head sommelier, Mario, planning memorable meals and landmark bottles. Montrachet, Chanterelle and Veritas all feature in this story of a wine lover, but it is perhaps Le Bernardin that has been the restaurant of his heart. My theory is that Don Stott’s other passion is fishing and the fish at Le Bernardin is unrivaled.

Don Stott’s Park Avenue apartment was, for 45 years, a scene of great hospitality. The cellar in Summit housed 12,000 bottles from the collection which, at its peak, contained an additional 100,000 bottles in storage. In the late 1980s, Don went to France with John Gilman, the well-known Burgundy merchant and writer. The visits to Burgundy multiplied and the Hôtel de Beaune was Don’s headquarters from where he made his sorties to the growers he admires and respects. Johan Björklund cooked great meals there and Don eventually bought a share of the ownership in the hotel. Now, he had put down roots and was “part of the scenery” in Burgundy, visiting several times a year for weeks at a time and building strong relationships with the very best growers.

268N09327_XXXXX_SILO12 bottles, 1971 BonneMares, Domaine George Roumier ($32,500–42,500)

Don Stott loves the Burgundians. They are as highly individual as their wines – this is not a corporate wine region. He speaks with real affection for many of Burgundy’s finest producers such as Christophe Roumier, Jean-Marc Roulot, Dominique Lafon, Eric Rousseau, Véronique Drouhin and Louis-Michel Liger Belair. No doubt, their mutual appreciation of fine food with these unique wines has forged strong links and endless memories.

The superb wines in this fabulous collection are a reflection of the preferences of the owner. The Burgundy is mouthwatering, absolutely sensational, the German wines are revelatory, the vins d’Alsace are a rare treat, the Rhônes and Champagnes are mythical in their scope and beauty, the Bordeaux are majestic and the Californians and the Italians are the best. Maybe the most exciting element of all is the fact that you can drink everything from now, if you so wish – and I do.

This really is The Unforgettable Collection.

Article provided by, Serena Sutcliff, MW Sotheby’s international wine specialist and one of the world’s leading authorities on wine.

Explore The Don Stott Cellar: 50 Years of Collecting will be sold in New York on 8–9 May >

The Great Outdoors | Art & Home

The latest edition of Art & Home is here! From thoughtfully landscaped grounds to immaculately manicured gardens, what lies just outside the front door is what makes a house a home, finds Iyna Bort Caruso.

IMG_9061Art & Home—May 2015

Frederick Law Olmsted, the founder of American landscape architecture, sought to channel the “genius of a place” in his projects. He believed every habitat had a spirit of its own and accessing that quality was the most meaningful way to connect with one’s surroundings.

At their best, designed landscapes appear spontaneous – an extension of nature’s best expression. On private estates, these elegant statements go beyond initial visual impressions or curb appeal. Gardens are a full sensory experience of colors, scents and textures. They lure you inside and guide you through multiple spaces that, by turns, can be meditative, enchanting and surprising. “Gardens are very experiential and very ethereal,” says Miami-based landscape architect Raymond Jungles, who has worked throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.

In reinterpreting the environment, designers consider the site, orientation of the sun, climate and architectural style of the residence. Landscapes can also be used to camouflage flaws. For homes that lack strong aesthetic merit, “landscaping can become the dominant design element that allows residences to recede and fade into the environment,” says Jungles.

Gardens are points of personal pride and neighborhood identity. In cities like Charleston, South Carolina, where estates are known for their flourishing azaleas, oleanders, camellias, crepe myrtles and magnolias, “people spend a good deal of time outside on their porches and in their gardens,” says Daniel Ravenel of Sotheby’s International Realty in Charleston. “It’s part of our way of life.”

Even in dense urban settings, rooftop gardens, courtyards and balconies enable residents to feel connected to nature. They soften the city’s hard edges while providing an oasis of calm.

Olmsted well recognized the effect. “Gradually and silently the charm comes over us,” he said on a trip to England in 1850. “We know not exactly where or how.”

Charleston$5,900,000 USD | Charleston, South Carolina |Daniel Ravenel Sotheby’s International

This grand lakefront estate exudes the elegance and grace of an historic English manor. Charming gothic features throughout the home are tastefully and thoughtfully combined with the highest modern technologies to create the ultimate retreat. The expansive grounds are comprised of a unique synergy of lakeside views with sophisticated gardens.

BridgehamptonPrice Upon Request |Bridgehampton, New York |Sotheby’s International Realty – Bridgehampton Brokerage

Combining the elegance of a royal European country estate with the amenities of a five-star resort, Three Ponds Farm offers an unparalleled private residence on nearly 60 picturesque acres. Meticulously designed and executed with the finest imported materials, the eight-bedroom, twelve-bath manor home with guest wing and staff quarters is a tour de force of custom luxury design and contemporary flair by renowned architect Allan Greenberg. The beautiful outdoor oasis includes magnificent formal gardens, a rose garden with orangery and over 7,000 specimen trees.

Las Vegas$28,000,000 USD | Las Vegas, Nevada | Synergy Sotheby’s International Realty

Built to the most exacting standards and exemplifying graceful and symmetrical design, the Rameses Estate took over five years to remodel. This singular property comprises a main residence of over 13,000-square-feet with six bedroom suites and nine bathrooms, as well as a private office, screening room, billiard room, art room and four-car garage. Venturing beyond the picturesque residence, guests find themselves in formal gardens that flow into expansive lawns, private walkways and romantic rose gardens.

Texas$24,500,000 USD | Magnolia, Texas| Kuper Sotheby’s International Realty

With the planting of over 20,000 trees, shrubs and flowers through the years, the spectacular Emerald Lake Estate is a veritable paradise with a resort-like ambience. This meticulously developed estate boasts the private 25-acre Emerald Lake, a world-class bass lake with ten islands, a nine-acre Japanese garden and a seven-acre botanical garden with over 5,000 azaleas, both designed by landscape architect Keiji Asakura.

FrancePrice Upon Request | Côte D’Azur, France | Côte D’Azur Sotheby’s International Realty

On the Golf de Biot, discover this sublime and rare residence designed by architect André Svetchine. This beautiful domain is entirely enclosed, offering exceptional living amidst French gardens, ponds and olive trees. The main property provides spacious living opening onto two terraces; one is covered and overlooks the French gardens while the other overlooks the park.

New York-based writer Iyna Bort Caruso has contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Newsday, among others.

View the digital version of this issue here: Art & Home May 2015

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Magnificent Jewels at Sotheby’s New York

The 21 April sale of Magnificent Jewels in New York is led by a diamond unlike any offered before: an extraordinary 100-carat perfect diamond in a classic Emerald-cut that is estimated to sell for $19–25 million. At this impressive scale, diamonds of this exceptional quality – D color and Internally Flawless clarity – are incredibly rare, and are considered ‘perfect’. What distinguishes the present example within this rarefied league is its beautiful shape: it is the largest perfect diamond with a classic Emerald-cut ever to be offered at auction. The original rough – weighing over 200 carats – was mined by De Beers in southern Africa. The current owner spent over one year studying, cutting and polishing the rough diamond to deliver the spectacular stone.

Emerald Cut Diamond

Also showcased in this sale are pieces from a variety of makers that exemplify the Art Moderne movement. What these pieces have in common is their bold nature, their use of unexpected materials and their allusions to modern society. Art Moderne jewelers were not concerned with the intrinsic value of their work; they felt jewelry should be bold enough to command attention from afar yet personal enough to speak to the wearer of the jewel. Many designers represented in the Magnificent Jewels sale such as Gérard Sandoz, André Rivaud and Jean Després had families rooted in the jewelry industry. Many were also deeply connected to the art world, further fueling their desire and ability to transform jewelry design.

art-moderne-318 Karat Gold Bracelet, Jean Després, France. Estimate $75,000–85,000.

art-moderne-4

18 Karat Gold and Lapis Lazuli Bracelet, Cartier, Paris. Estimate $7,000–9,000.

 

art-moderne-1

18 Karat Gold and Coral Brooch, Cartier, Paris. Estimate $25,000–35,000.

2015 Sotheby’s Showhouse | AD 100 Designed Homes

This week, Sotheby’s, along with Sotheby’s International Realty and Architectural Digest, will present its second annual Designer Showhouse, where 14 interior designers will each design a room using a diverse selection of fine and decorative art in one of Sotheby’s museum quality gallery spaces.

In celebration of the event, Sotheby’s International Realty is proud to present a curated collection of extraordinary residences for sale designed by members of Architectural Digest’s prestigious AD100, its annual ranking of the world’s preeminent architects and designers. Rarely offered for sale, homes designed by members of the exclusive AD100 offer the opportunity to live in an extraordinary space designed by the men and women who are shaping the way we live—one building, one house, one room at a time.

42mil Central Park West NYC$42,000,000 USD | Central Park West, Manhattan, New York

Shelton, Mindel & Associates — listed numerous times by Architectural Digest’s AD100 — brought their refined sensibilities to the recent renovation of this rare five-bedroom home in one of Manhattan’s finest prewar buildings.

Greenwich Connecticut$27,895,000 USD | Conyers Farm, Greenwich, Connecticut

At the heart of this 30.97-acre compound is a sophisticated country estate designed by the influential Alan Wanzenberg, who was included on Architectural Digest’s 2014 AD100 list of the world’s best interior designers and architects.

Egypt Lane East Hampton NY$13,900,000 USD | Egypt Lane, East Hampton, New York

Architect Alexander Gorlin, recognized on Architectural Digest’s AD100 every year since 2000, is recognized for splendid private residences such as this one. The main house of this East Hampton compound has an open layout of enchanting rooms leading to broad verandas and beautifully landscaped grounds.

Sotheby’s Designer Showhouse is open to the public this Saturday, April 11th through Sunday, April 19th on the fifth floor exhibition space of the Manhattan headquarters located at 1334 York Avenue.

Sotheby’s Second Annual Designer Showhouse in New York

2015 Designer Showhouse.jpg

For the second year, Sotheby’s is pleased to present the Designer Showhouse from April 11-19th. The event, which is sponsored by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc., will feature thirteen interior designers and design firms who will each curate a room on the fifth floor exhibition space of the Manhattan headquarters. The objects, around 300 in all, come from myriad Sotheby’s departments – American Paintings, Silver, Photography, English Furniture, Carpets, 20th-century Design and more. The show will culminate with a dedicated auction on April 20th. Each space, ranging from a bedroom and living room, to a dining room and library will evoke the designer’s unique aesthetic.

See below for a sneak peek at some of the participating designers and photographs of their recent projects. Their completed designs will be unveiled at Sotheby’s on April 11th.

Kravis & Cullman Living Room

“We love mixing traditional art in a modern setting or hanging a contemporary painting over a beautiful 18th-century chest,” Elisa Cullman of Cullman & Kravis.

Piccione Dining Room

“I really love dining rooms,” says Russell Piccione, who believes that a home is not complete without “a space for the celebration of domestic rituals.”

Library

“The library as an independent space in the home remains very much in vogue in high-end residential design,” says Juan Carretero of New York firm Capital C Interiors.

Eric Cohler Family Room

“They want to live with what they love, but comfortably,” says the New York-based Eric Cohler of the couple he envisions inhabiting the Sotheby’s Showhouse.

Sotheby’s Designer Showhouse is open to the public Saturday, April 11th through Sunday, April 19th on the fifth floor exhibition space of the Manhattan headquarters located at 1334 York Avenue.

Serenity Now | Art & Home

IMG_8517

 Art & Home – April 2015

The latest edition of Art & Home is here! This month we’re showcasing tranquil, harmonious environments inspired by Asia that provide refuge from the hustle and bustle of the modern world.

California$2,300,000 USD | Beverly Hills, California | Sotheby’s International Realty- Beverly Hills Brokerage

Because the external world seems to be in a perpetually chaotic and frenzied whirlwind, internally, serenity is always in style.Creating a calm, meditative state within one’s home with an environment that’s at once soothing, orderly and sophisticated, can be achieved by incorporating earthy colors with inspired furnishings and restrained accessories, so each room is a serene, tranquil haven.

Colorado$2,625,000 USD | Telluride, Colorado | Telluride Sotheby’s International Realty

The hallmark of this approach: Asian-inspired décor, which utilizes classic elements from exotic nations such as China, Japan, India and Nepal: a Mongolian area rug; an antique, blue and white Chinese vase from the Ming Dynasty; a delicately hand-painted Japanese screen; an ornately carved console or chest.  The Zen is in the details. “Clients want touches, not whole spaces, to look Asian,” said French native interior designer Marie Burgos.

North Carolina$7,800,000 USD | Raleigh, North Carolina | Hodge & Kittrell Sotheby’s International Realty

So the key to a successful design is not to recreate period rooms, noted New York City interior designer Geoffrey Bradfield, but rather to employ economy of design with carefully selected, refined furnishings that have clean lines, combined with a selection of ornamental pieces, for an eclectic effect. “Contemporary Asian styling is less ornate than in previous years, less formal and rigid,” added Andrew Hunter of Sotheby’s International Realty in Thailand.

Thailand$9,750,000 USD | Phuket, Thailand | Hunter Sotheby’s International Realty

Additionally, the principles of feng shui are sometimes utilized to emphasize an uncluttered, open flow throughout the spaces, and to accentuate harmony and balance.  To that end, New York-based Burgos incorporates the five natural elements –wood, fire, earth, metal and water—in her home designs.  The elements needn’t be literal, she emphasized.  The earth, for instance, can be represented with a collection of terra cotta vases or stone tiles. Fire can come into play via an interpretive lighting fixture, while a pop of red in a painting can serve the same purpose.   But it’s best to keep the overall color palette in neutral tones to underscore the desired intent:  a peaceful space.

Article provided by Claudia Cryvatz Copquin exclusively for Art & Home. 

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Sotheby’s Celebrates Spring 2015 Asia Week NY

This week Sotheby’s celebrates Asia Week 2015 in New York by showcasing the cultures and art of Asia. With over a week of exhibitions, lectures, and events, the citywide program will also include various pieces up for auction. From Sakamoto Gorō and Classical Chinese Paintings, to early Ceramics from the Yang De Tang Collection and much more, the celebration is an extraordinary opportunity for collectors and enthusiasts alike. asiaweek_spring2015_banner_4.jpg.webrend.1920.350 Highlights Include:

003N09336_7YS3BA Rare Blue and White ‘Peony’ Jar, Guan | Yuan Dynasty | Estimate 1,000,000 – 1,500,00 USD

193N09319_7YSNYAn Important Thangka of the Vajradhatu Mandala | Tibet, 11th Century | Estimate 800,000 – 1,200,000 USD

N09317-295_webA Set of Four Famille-Rose ‘Eight Immortals’ Panels by Wang Qi (1884-1937) | Estimated 500,000 – 700,000 USD

 

Belle of the Ballroom | Back en Vogue

The latest edition of Art & Home is here! This month we’re showcasing exquisite ballrooms found in some our most sought after, exclusive international properties. From Tuscany and the Czech Republic to Houston and New York, ballrooms are back in vogue.

art-and-homeArt & Home – March 2015

Among the labyrinth of rooms that make up grand old estates, none is more evocative than the ballroom. You can practically hear the orchestra, feel the rhythm and see the dancers in flickers of gloriously bygone images.

Italy25.000.000 € EUR | Lucca, Italy | Tuscany Sotheby’s International Realty

These Downton Abbey-worthy dance halls are legacies of a time when formal entertaining at home was common and square footage was considerable. Ballrooms demanded generous, obstruction-free dimensions with high ceilings for optimal acoustics.

NewYork$12,000,000 USD | Lloyd Harbor, NY | Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty

Grand and gilded ballrooms have largely gone the way of drawing rooms, fainting rooms, cloakrooms. Chambers given over to the sole pleasures of music and dance are extravagances are now near exclusive to hotels and private clubs. Modern life is lived less formally and more intimately with a lot more entertainment options than gliding across the hardwoods in three-quarter time.

KlecanyPrice Upon Request  | Central Bohemia, Czech Republic | Czech Republic Sotheby’s International Realty

Some residential ballrooms have been repurposed for more practical activities like playrooms, gymnasiums or home theaters. Others have been partitioned into cozier spaces. And yet in some homes, ballrooms are enjoying an afterlife.

Texas$43,000,000 USD| Houston, Texas | Martha Turner Sotheby’s International Realty

Martha Turner, founder and co-presidentof Martha Turner Sotheby’s International Realty in Houston, Texas, can tick off a number of estates with private ballrooms still used in ways that honor their original intention. The very first home she sold was an early 20th century residence in the prestigious Courtlandt Place Historic District with a third-floor ballroom that remains in tact. Examples span the decades. A modern Versailles-inspired chateau on the market for $43 million–Houston’s priciest ever–features a breathtaking ballroom among its many public spaces. The current homeowners use it for large-scale entertaining, concert performances and charity galas. And then there’s a pair of would-be Fred and Gingers so passionate about dancing that when they couldn’t find an existing residence for sale with a ballroom, they decided to construct a new one.

Connecticut$5,200,000 USD | Greenwich, Connecticut | Sotheby’s International Realty – Greenwich Brokerage

If you build it, they will rumba.

Article provided by Iyna Caruso exclusively for Art & Home.

View a digital version of this issue here >

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Altitude with Attitude | Dramatic Mountain Homes

The first edition of Art & Home is here, a new literary collaboration between Sotheby’s and Sotheby’s International Realty, showcasing all the elements of an extraordinary life. Eight times a year, it will engage readers with sophisticated content and beautiful images related to the art and real estate worlds. See below for the first Sotheby’s International Realty featured article, Altitude with Attitude.

Art_and_HomeArt & Home January-February 2015

Not long ago, modern mountain architecture was an aberration. Today, it’s a movement. Alpine architects are now in the rules-breaking business. They’re importing exotic materials and innovative ideas from around the world for a mile-high mash-up of contemporary design and modern sensibilities.

Refined is the new rustic.

Shed roofs are replacing complicated gables. Floating stairs are nudging out log staircases. Mini-skyscrapers are rising on mountaintops.

Edwards$7,995,000 USD | Edwards, Colorado | Ascent Sotheby’s International Realty

Modern mountain design encourages homeowners to toss aside notions of what a resort residence should be and redefine the vacation home experience. Advances in materials, construction techniques and engineering allow for more stylistic choices and greater personal expression in the most challenging locations and elevations. Those technical advances have also facilitated an important shift. Mountain residences no longer need be built as protective shelters against harsh environments. They can be inviting light-filled spaces animated by sun and brilliant vistas.

Imported materials, progressive designs and artisan crews come at a price, which is why avant garde architecture is typically found at the highest end of the market. “When you’re willing to pay $3,000 a square foot, that opens the door for craftsmanship and quality,” says Tye Stockton of Ascent Sotheby’s International Realty in Vail, Colo. “Affluent buyers are less concerned about budget and more concerned about the emotional feelings that gets stirred in them.”

FrancePrice Upon Request | Megeve, France | Propriétés de Megève Sotheby’s International Realty

Stockton is putting the finishing touches on his own modern mountain estate, one that hints at industrial design with steel I-beams and rolled steel decorative panels warmed up with imported reclaimed woods. The kitchen is sleek with stealth appliances and poured concrete countertops. Glass is one of modern architecture’s most fundamental materials, and Stockton employs it as a showstopper. A 10-foot-tall sliding glass wall system opens onto a quintessential Rocky Mountain panorama of jagged peaks and waterfalls. “In traditional mountain homes, solid walls are for hanging art. With modern, there’s expansive glass and the exterior is your art,” he says. “It’s magical.”

Modern is also unpredictable. And therein lies its seduction. “The more chances you take, the more creative the work,” says Stockton, “and the more exciting it is.”

Article provided by Iyna Caruso exclusively for Art & Home.

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